greenbackgrazers


Sun Shine Day
April 20, 2012, 9:29 AM
Filed under: Healthly Living

With the beautiful days we’ve had recently, I have been thinking about sun protectant.  After experiencing some very bad burns I have become more conscious of suncreen and other helpful ways to protect and heal. 

Put enough on.The recommended application for adequate protection is 35 to 40ml per person per session (a handful). “So someone may think they are applying SPF15, say, but if they don’t use the correct amount then it may only be equivalent to SPF8.  Inexpensive brands are just as effective as the more expensive brands.  Apply correctlySunscreen should be applied to clean, dry skin 30 minutes before exposure to the sun which allows it time to absorb properly.

  • Take time out in the shade between 11 am and 3 pm when them sun is strongest, but still apply sun screen because sand, concrete and water can reflect harmful rays.
  • Reapply.  Perspiration, exercise, swimming and towel-drying removes sun creams from the skin so you should reapply after taking part in any of these activities, even if the product is “waterproof.”
  • Everyday use of sun lotions on your face and back of the hands will limit the chances of developing dry leathery skin, wrinkles, mottling and other signs of premature aging and skin cancer.
  • Cover up in the sun with loose cotton clothing, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses with UV protection.
  • Use a “broad spectrum” sunscreen with a sun protection factor of at least 15 to protect against harmful UVA and UVB rays.
  • Overcast weather still requires sunscreen in summer because 80 per cent of ultra-violet radiation is still present on cloudy days.
  • Children and babies need greater protection so use specially formulated kids ranges with gentler ingredients and higher SPFs.
  • Know the Sun Protection Factor (SPF): appropriate for your skin type and intended time in the sun. The SPF number indicates how many times longer a person can stay in the sun before beginning to burn. SPF numbers usually range from 2 to 50.
  • If you are taking medication check with your physician or pharmacist: before going in the sun. Some medicines can make your skin sensitive to the sun.

After the Sun:

Act Quickly.  If you feel the tale-tell tingling of a burn or see any sign of skin reddening on yourself or your child, get out of the sun and start treatment. “Sunburn tends to sneak up on us. It can take four to six hours for the symptoms to develop

Moisturize skin after sun exposure: Look for sun products that contain moisturizers, such as vitamin E and aloe to replenish the lost moisture after sun exposure.

Hydrate.  Any burn draws fluid to the skin surface and away from the rest of the body. So drink extra water, juice and sports drinks for a couple of days and watch for signs of dehydration: Dry mouth, thirst, reduced urination, headache, dizziness and sleepiness. Children are especially vulnerable, so check with a doctor if they appear ill.

Don’t wait to Mediacate.  Take (or give your child) a dose of ibuprofen (for example, Advil) as soon as you see signs of sunburn and keep it up for the next 48 hours, Schmitt advises. “It cuts back on the swelling and redness that is going to occur” and might prevent some long-term skin damage. “It’s not just treating the symptoms; it’s treating the severity of the symptoms.” Acetaminophen (for example, Tylenol) will treat the pain, but does not have the same anti-inflammatory effect.

Assess the Damage.

Most sunburns, even those that cause a few blisters, can be treated at home. But if a blistering burn covers 20% or more of the body (a child’s whole back), seek medical attention, Allen says. Anyone with a sunburn who is suffering fevers and chills should also seek medical help, he says. Finally: Consider the burn a warning that your sun-safety net has failed and vow to do better. That means using sunscreen, covering up with clothing and hats and avoiding the sun as much as possible between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

 

Tips On Applying Self Tanners

  •  Jump in the shower – never apply fake tan unless you’ve washed beforehand.
  • Exfoliate all over to remove dead skin cells.
  • Don’t shave less than 24 hours beforehand or tan will sit in the open pores and you’ll end up with freckled looking legs.
  • Next, moisturize with a light lotion. Dry skin sucks up color, resulting in patchy areas.
  • Take your time when applying. Put it on like there’s no tomorrow and you’ll regret it!

Home remedies for Sunburn:

 

1.  Adding a few heaping tablespoons of baking soda to cool bath water makes a sunburn-soothing remedy. Just keep your soaking time down to 15 to 20 minutes. If you soak any longer, you risk drying out your already lizard-like skin. When you’ve emerged from the bath, resist the urge to towel off. Instead air-dry, and don’t wipe the baking soda off.

2.  Oatmeal added to cool bath water offers another wonderful relief for sunburned skin. Fill up the bathtub with cool water–not cold water because that can send the body into shock. Don’t use bath salts, oils, or bubble bath. Instead, scoop 1/2 to 1 cup oatmeal — an ideal skin soother — and mix it in. Another option is to buy Aveeno, an oatmeal powder found in the pharmacy. Follow the packet’s directions. As with the baking soda, air-dry your body and don’t wipe the oatmeal off your skin.

3.  The thick, gel-like juice of the aloe vera plant can take the sting and redness out of a sunburn. Aloe vera causes blood vessels to constrict. Luckily, this healing plant is available at your local nursery or even in the grocery store’s floral department. Simply slit open one of the broad leaves and apply the gel directly to the burn. Apply five to six times per day for several days.

4.  Soak a washcloth in cool water and apply it directly to the burned areas (do not apply ice or an ice pack to sunburned skin) for several minutes, rewetting the cloth often to keep it cool. Apply the compress multiple times throughout the day as needed to relieve discomfort. You can also add a soothing ingredient, such as baking soda or oatmeal, to the compress water. Simply shake a bit of baking soda into the water before soaking the cloth. Or wrap dry oatmeal in a cheesecloth or a piece of gauze and run water through it. Then toss out the oatmeal and soak the compress in the oatmeal water.

5.  As the sun fried your skin, it also dehydrated it. Be sure to replenish liquids by drinking plenty of water while recovering from a sunburn. Being well hydrated will help burns heal better. You’ll know you’re hydrated when your urine runs almost clear.

6.  The plain old potato makes for a wonderful pain reliever. It’s a time-tested technique known throughout the world. Take two washed potatoes, cut them into small chunks, and place them in a blender or food processor. Blend or process until the potatoes are in liquid form. Add water if they look dry. Pat the burned areas with the pulverized potatoes. Wait until the potatoes dry, then take a cool shower. Another less messy method is to apply the mash to a clean gauze and place on the burn. Change the dressing every hour. Continue applying several times a day for a few days until the pain is relieved.

7.  Sunburns often strike where skin meets bathing suit. Sensitive and hard-to-reach spots you’ve neglected to smear with suntan lotion (along bikini lines, underneath buttock cheeks, or around the breasts and armpits) often fall victim. These burn spots then have to face daily irritation from tight elastic in bras and underwear. To ease chafing, cover the burned area with a dusting of cornstarch. Don’t apply petroleum jelly or oils, which can exacerbate the burn by blocking pores. If the burn is blistering, however, don’t apply anything.

8.  Topical anesthetics such as Solarcaine may offer some temporary relief from pain and itching. Look for products that contain lidocaine, which is less likely than some of the other topical anesthetics to cause an allergic reaction. Because some people do have allergic reactions to such products, test a small area of skin before using it all over. Topical anesthetics come in both creams and sprays. The sprays are easier to apply to a sunburn, especially when it is widespread. If you use one, avoid spraying it directly onto the face. Instead, spray some onto gauze and gently dab it on.

 

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Comment by Diedre Trotto




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